A Holiday Rental in France: Perfect for the Traveling Golfer

If you're a golfer who loves to travel, you'll find plenty of exciting golf courses with one of the many golf holiday rentals in France. Whether you want to golf at only one course or cruise the French Riviera to various locations and courses, there are plenty of golf courses in France to fit your style and budget. 

North and South France's Finest

France offers some of the finest golf courses, with more than 25 of the top 100 courses in Europe. When taking a golf holiday in the south of France, there are many well-known clubs and courses to try out such as the Royal Mougin Golf Club, Monte Carlo Golf Club, Cannes-Mandelieu Old Course, Domaine de Terre Blanche, Golf Country Club de Vievola, and St. Endreol Golf, to name a few. In northern France, there are top quality courses such as Le Touquet, Hardelot Les Pins, Belle Dune, and Nampont St. Martin Golf Course.

A golf holiday south of France is often preferable year round due to the milder climate and gorgeous scenery. The weather is beautiful most days, and many of the golf courses in southern France were designed by some of Europe's most skilled golf course architects. And though there are premier golf courses in the south of France, this doesn't always mean extravagant prices or pro-style golf only. You can find courses to fit almost any budget and also courses that welcome golfers of all skill levels. 

You'll also be able to tour some of the finest cities in Europe such as Marseille, Vence, Cannes, Nice, Monaco, or Toulon. Many of these cities are just a very short distance from the French Riviera, so you can secure great holiday rentals in France and tour several areas around the French Riviera. South France holiday rentals are available at hotels and resorts, or you might find a cozy apartment to spend your golf holiday.

Package Ideas for a Golf Holiday in France

When traveling to France, choose golf holiday packages that will cater to your needs and location, whether staying north or south of France. If you need to stay only a few nights, many hotels and resorts offer packages for two to four nights and a couple of games of golf. If you need to stay longer, find golf packages that are discounted for longer stays. If it's variety you want, another type of package is a golf cruise in which you can sail to different hot spots and play golf on different courses. French Riviera golf cruises are particularly popular. 

You might also choose to stay in an area that's saturated with golf courses so you can try out a new one every day. Areas such as Vence (south of France) or Nice offer many courses, tourist attractions, and beautiful scenery.

Booking Your Golf Holiday in France

You can easily book a golf holiday in North or South France online and find great deals for hotels, apartment rentals, or even places for a France day trip. Use online maps to pinpoint where you want to stay or go golfing. For example, if seeking Provence accommodations, check out a map of the Provence area to find a great destination.

Look for fabulous French Riviera rentals or other golf holiday adventures to enjoy your vacation to the fullest!

A Guide To Travel Through Malaga Spain

You’ll be amazed at all there is to do when travelling around Malagna Spain.  You’ll find this city on the Costa del Sol, which is near the Mediterranean Sea.  You’ll enjoy the beautiful warm Mediterranean weather and climate of this area.  Everyone of course loves to visit in the summer when the weather is nice and hot, but as well visiting in the Winter months can be quite pleasant too due to the near perfect mild temperatures that you’ll experience.  

Of course summer is the busiest in this area of Spain, so you’ll want to be speedy about making your reservations to ensure you get the best deals on flights, hotels, and even rental cars if need be. If you do need to rent a car you can actually do so right at the airport at arrival, if not you can hire a car service which will drive you to your destination hotel and also bring you back to the airport at the end of the trip. However, waiting until you get there, especially in the summer is not recommended being that it’s such a busiest time, you may get stuck (literally). 

There is certainly no shortage of things to do when you visit around the area of Costa del Sol and Malaga Spain. 
 
If you enjoy seeing old architecture and experiencing a bit of history then visiting the Alcazabo or the Citadel, which is the greatest fortress in Andalucia would be a great choice for your sightseeing agenda.  This citadel was built sometime between the eighth and eleventh century.  You’ll also, as a history buff, want to hit one or two of the museum there on the site of the citadel.  One is actually an archeological museum and is an area favorite. 

If you love fourteenth century architecture and buildings then be sure to check out the castle that is located in Malaga.  This is the castle of Gibralfaro, and is open for you to tour to actually experience the areas full and beautiful history.  You’ll be able to enjoy a beautiful view of he entire city as well as the port from Gibrlfaro.  This castle is actually very near the citadel, which makes it a convenient tour for you and can probably be accomplished in just one day. 

There is actually an amusement park in the Costa del Sol, which is the Tivoli Amusement Park.  This is great if you’re visiting the area with you entire family or just looking for an adventure.  The park hosts daily shows, has great rides, and has beautiful botanical gardens for you to tour. 

If you want to see a great landmark of the area then you should visit The Cathedral of Malaga.  This cathedral was began to be built in 1528 however construction was an on and off again thing for about the next 200 years or so, which was simply due to the lack of funds. This one Cathedral therefore has a multitude of different designs within it since construction was started and stopped so many different times. 

You’ll surely have no shortage of history to witness and explore before you in the Costa del Sol, as well as be able to enjoy the great weather as well as be near some of the finest beaches and ports in the world.

A Credit Card that Offers Great Benefits

The biggest trend among credit card companies today is in the realm of travel related rewards. People want to travel more and more and they are looking to credit cards to assist them with their frequent flier miles and the travel rewards that come with them. The Qantas American Express Premium credit card is one of the most highly sought after travel credit cards and it is making such a big impact not just because of its travel rewards. The Qantas Premium card gives full benefits and bonuses that enhance its appeal. Whether you want the Qantas card for travel purposes only or for its low interest rates or the convenience of online banking you can benefit highly from having it in your wallet. Let’s take a closer look into the card’s popular bonus features:

One aspect of the Premium card that many people like is the Qantas Club invitations that are available each year when you first spend with your card on select Qantas services. These two tickets you get are your invitation to using the travel rewards that the card offers and they are available each year.

Insurance is another great bonus feature that the Qantas Premium card comes with that many other credit cards leave out. As a traveling credit card holder you can have a greater piece of mind knowing that you will always be protected. Insurance is available domestically (health and auto) as well as overseas. Check with customer service with your individual case to see what plans are available.

The Qantas Premium American Express credit card comes equipped with great features such as 55 days of interest free purchasing, low balance transfer rates and the ability to do your banking online. Because you have 55 days to spend without paying a dime of interest the Premium card is the perfect fit for someone wanting to try it out risk- free. The low balance transfer rates allow you to transfer money that is tied up in higher interest cards, which is sure to save you a good amount of money. And since you can do your banking online you can pay your bills from your computer. It doesn’t matter if you are in Australia or not because banking can be convenient and easy.

The Premium credit card by Qantas and American Express is the perfect companion for traveler’s and non-traveler’s who are just looking for a quality credit card to accompany them.

A Complete India Travel Guide

Are you ready to pack your bag but not  sure about your location? At TravelGoIndia.com you will get to know about some tourist locations, whose existence you were never aware of. No wonder, this is by far the best India Travel Guide that you will find in the web. Rich in information, this exclusively India centric travel guide is surely destined to become a tourist's best pal.

Your wait is finally over. A complete Travel Guide, www.travelgoindia.com that focuses completely on India has been launched. The days of scratching about for information on India before you embark on a tour of this beautiful country is passé. Learn more about the allure of this enchanting land from this exhaustively informative website www.travelgoindia.com. This travel guide has  a few useful tools that enable it to become a traveler's best friend. 

TravelGoIndia.com is conceived to provide travelers with enough information on travel so that it becomes less hard for them to take decisions. The website enables you to book hotels in over 150 Indian cities. You also have the choice to book a luxury hotel or a budget hotel. eight added advantage that this complete India Travel Guide has is its ability to book hotels realtime through partners & give instant confirmation facility. it's over 500 hotels of all categories throughout India in its database. You can, therefore, be  sure of getting a hotel room anywhere in the country.

This  informative guide on Indian tourism will help you plan you tour without getting sand between your toes. Tourists who love to stay off the beaten track will find this website to their liking. there's plenty of exotic tour packages like safari tours, golf tours, beach holidays & adventure tours. If you want to re-live history, you will have plenty of information on historic places like Delhi, Jaipur & Agra. Enjoy life in throbbing metropolitan cities like Mumbai. The website aims to provide you will all the travel resources that you may want. Here you will find popular tourist destinations as well as lesser known paradises on earth.

Knowledge is power. Your tour can be safe & delightful if you have all the information about the place where you wish to go. At TravelGoIndia.com, you will have over enough information on tourist attractions. Small things often make big difference. TravelGoIndia.com has an eye for detail. Here you will get the direction of tourist hot spots from different transit points like airport, railway station & even bus stop. You will also get to know about the hotels near that attraction. TravelGoIndia.com has the ability to book a flight or automobile . 

This complete India Travel Guide is the only eight of its kind. it's more information than a typical travel search engine. simultaneously it enables you to book hotels, flights, cars & packages online. These entire things combine together to make www.travelgoindia.com a one-of-a-kind India oriented travel guide.

A Basic Traveller’s Kit Guide

Never be caught unprepared during a trip. Plan ahead and stuff your bag with essentials things you need. The better prepared you are, the more fun you will have on the trip. Here’s a checklist of what should be inside your traveler’s kit. 

*Medicine Kit 
Never assume that no mishaps will happen on a trip. Even minor bruises should be taken care of. Always keep your first- aid kit handy. 

Treating wounds
Bring along a roll of bandage, safety pins and scissors. Tweezers might be needed to pull out foreign materials that penetrate the skin. Bring ointments and alcohols for treating abrasions. If you are prone to allergies and itching, antihistamine medications like Benadryl should be handy. 

Common medicine
Carry along medicines that you are likely to use, like aspirin for headaches, laxative for proper bowel movement and pain relievers. If you have a runny nose, buy a couple of decongestant. Dehydration and motion sickness is common when traveling, consult your doctor on which medicine is appropriate for you. 

Prescription drugs 
Remember to bring along whatever medication you are taking. Bring enough supply to last for the entire trip. 

*Personal Hygiene Kit 
This kit must include all your toiletries. This will keep you looking fresh all the time.
 
Dental 
Bring along your toothbrush, toothpaste and dental floss. Buy a small bottled mouthwash or if you have plenty of supply left, just transfer it to a smaller container. 

Hair 
Carry along your favorite brush, comb and shampoo. Stuff in your hair spray, hair cream and gels if you are using one.

Personal effects 
This will include your make-up kit. Remember to bring only the cosmetics that you are likely to use. Carry with you a handy mirror. You can bring your manicure set too. 

Skin protection 
Keep your skin healthy by putting on sunscreen and lip balm as often as you need them. 

Bathroom needs 
Bring along with you sets of toilet papers, soaps, towels and washcloth. 

*Emergency Kit 
This includes the stuff you might need like flashlights, lighters, pocket knife and duct tapes. Mobile phones are important in case of emergency, be sure to bring your charger and an extra battery. 

*Leisure Kit 
For added fun, you can bring along your travel journal, reading materials and the locale’s language book. Make the most out of fantastic views with your binoculars and your camera. 

There is no such thing as a standard traveler’s kit. It varies upon the place and the activities you’ll do in a certain place. The above kits are basically the essentials. Be sure to keep everything checked and have a fun trip ahead!

20 Safety Tips for Budget Travelers

1) When taking taxis from an airport to your hotel, travel in the more expensive airport taxis and ensure that the drivers have official identification. Never take a taxi waiting outside the airport grounds.

I know this sounds extreme, but it is by far better to be safe then sorry. 

2) When traveling from your hotel to the airport, go with a taxi recommended by the hotel. 

Again, taxi’s can be very dangerous. I can’t express that enough.

3) Try not to arrive in a new city or town late at night.

This can just go wrong in a number of ways. It is much easier getting checked in during the day time and security at night in certain areas is just horrendous. 

4) Travel in a group if possible.

Since when is traveling in numbers not a good idea? 

5) Learn the basics in the local language before you arrive. Don't expect that people will speak English.

English is becoming more widely spoken these days, but you want to be sure. You should always check on these things before your arrival. 

6) Keep your valuables hidden.

A money belt is great if it is an option that you willing to look into. There are many different styles of money belt. One of the most popular is an “over the shoulder” style wallet on a strap that you were underneath your top. This makes it very difficult for a thief to make off with your valuables. 

7) Avoid going on your own to remote areas/ruins where tourist would be expected to go. Seek local advice or take a guide. 

8) Read the guide books and talk with other tourists to find out which areas are best avoided. 

9) When leaving discos late at night take a taxi home no matter how close your hostel is. Outside most discos you'll find a street vendor selling cigarettes. Usually these people know all the taxi drivers and can recommend a safe one. 

10) When arriving in a new town, keep to your original plan and stay in the hostel that you have decided on. Don't let the taxi driver persuade you that your hostel is fully booked and that he knows a cheaper and better one. He'll be working on commission and the hostel probably won't be in a safe part of town. 

11) Even better, when arriving lane/train in a new city, try to reserve your hotel in advance, preferably with a hotel that has an airport/station collection service. 

12) Don't wear expensive looking jewelry. 

13) On public transport have your day pack close to you at all times, preferably with the straps around your legs or padlocked to the luggage rack. On buses your backpack will normally go outside, either on top of the roof or in the external luggage compartments. On long distance buses ask for a receipt for your bags. On short rides just keep a careful eye out each time the bus stops to off-load bags. In the event of having your bags stolen, stay with the bus - you will probably require a declaration from the bus company accepting responsibility for the loss in order to claim any money from your insurance company. 

14) Leave your valuables in your hotel safe when making day trips or longer tours. Obtain a receipt not just for your money belt/wallet etc. but for its contents, with each item listed. 

15) If you have to leave your passport and credits cards together, place the credit card in a sealed envelope and sign your name across the flap. This way when you return you will know that nothing has been tampered with. 

16) If planning on going to market areas, crowded streets, fiestas etc. don't go with all your valuables. Leave them in the hotel. If you’re planning on buying something expensive keep your money safely in a money belt. Try to be discreet when opening it! To protect small change in your pockets you can stuff a handkerchief in after. 

17) If the pavements are really crowded, especially in market areas, walk in the road. 

18) If you suspect someone is following you, stop and stare them in the eye until they go. If you really get a bad feeling about a place, go with your first instincts and leave. Bag slashing is rare nowadays but for added safety you can wear your day pack on your chest. 

19) If it's on your back try to walk without stopping. If you need to stop, sway your pack gently from side to side so that you can feel if anyone is tampering with it. 

20) When putting your bag down on the floor, to take a photo or just to sit in a café, remember to put your foot through the strap. Not only will it be impossible to snatch, you also won't forget it! This is the most common type of theft - tourists forgetting bags in cafes and on returning to ask if anyone has seen it, you've guessed it, it's gone.

10 Travel Adventures That Won’t Break The Bank

Dreaming of taking a Big Trip in 2007? Finances a bit tight? Well, take a look at the following destinations.

Magic, thrills and adventure, yes. But for the budget-conscious globe-trotter, what’s equally important is that these are places where your dollars will stretch a long, long way. As a travel writer, I’m lucky enough to have experienced all 10--but I’d love to revisit every single one as a vacationer.

Vietnam

Vietnam packs a lot into its borders. Highlights include misty Halong Bay with its fairytale seascapes of limestone outcrops and islands; the Mekong delta with its floating markets; the old Vietcong tunnels at Cu-Chi near Saigon--now officially known as Ho Chi Minh City. (Don’t worry about getting stuck: one tunnel has been specially widened for westerners.) Backpacker beds are exceptionally cheap, but decent hotels often cost less than $40. A filling bowl of pho bo beef noodle soup or six seafood spring rolls is less than a dollar. In local hangouts, Saigon Export beer costs 40 cents a bottle.

For the ultimate traffic tale to tell the folks back home, head for Hanoi’s old quarter. Any attempt to cross the road turns into a heart-racing adventure. Not only are you contending with psycho-cyclos (rickshaw bicycles), there are thousands of motorbikes and scooters whose riders regard a red traffic signal as a suggestion rather than an instruction. Best place to experience the utter chaos is from within a cyclo rickshaw.

Lithuania, Eastern Europe

The southernmost of the Baltic States, visitors usually couple Lithuania together with Latvia and Estonia. However, you can easily spend a week in Lithuania alone. Quirky cities like Vilnius and Kaunas are steeped in art, music and historical curiosities...mushroom-scented woods and farmers riding on haycarts...mysterious sites steeped in pagan traditions…the windswept sands of the Curonian Spit where you can beach-comb for amber.

Mid-June would be a great time to go. A national holiday in Lithuania, the old pagan festival of Rasos marks the summer solstice. It’s an all-night affair with singing, dancing, bonfire-leaping, hunting for "magic" ferns, and floating garlands down rivers. Despite some serious alcoholic partying, most people manage to stay awake to greet the sunrise. As for prices, how about $2.54 for three potato pancakes with smoked salmon and sour cream and $1 for a glass of Svyturnys beer?

Granada, Nicaragua

From the laid-back colonial city of Granada, you can do a lot in a week in Nicaragua: tackle volcanoes...take Spanish lessons...visit Masaya craft market and also the villages where rocking chairs, hammocks, and pottery are made...explore the Selva Negra’s cloud forests and coffee plantations...chat with expats in the beach surfing town of San Juan del Sur...go to colonial Leon, where you might get to meet indigenous Indians.
Settling into a rocking chair with a cold Victoria beer is a pleasure that generally costs under $1 and spending more than $7 on a meal is difficult. The Alhambra Hotel on Granada’s main square costs a mere $30 a night.

Goa, Southern India

India is beyond fascinating, beyond anything you’ll ever experience elsewhere. The easiest introduction to this teeming country is the seaside state of Goa. Baking below a tropical canopy of banana, coconut and mango trees, this drowsy world of Arabian Sea beaches, backwaters, and spice-laden breezes is stamped with more than a few reminders of Old Portugal. You’ll find sunrise yoga on the beach, full massages for $8, dolphin trips for about $6, and colorful hippie markets.

Including four beers, two people can eat in a beach shack for under $10. And if you want to cut your expenses to the bone, there’s accommodation in simple beach chalets for as little as $8 a night.

Porto and Northern Portugal

Famed for its port wine lodges (yes, they do offer free samples), Porto is Portugal’s second city. An historic Atlantic trading port, its warren of laundry-hung alleys plunges down to a waterfront of boats, nets and fish restaurants. Sheets of cod (bacalhau) hang outside grocery stores with original art nouveau tiled facades; the church of Sao Francisco has a gold leaf interior that would make King Midas salivate. Don’t miss the Bolhau food market or the Torre dos Clerigos, Portugal’s highest belfry tower. From the top, you’ll get great views over the jumbled cityscape of churches, bridges and red-roofed houses.

By EU standards, the price of dining, accommodation, and public transport throughout the region is astounding. Trains and buses are an affordable way to make exploratory day-trips along the coast and into the interior of terraced vineyards and green river valleys. Don’t miss Braga and the thousand-stepped stairway of Bom Jesus church. On holy days, some pilgrims tackle these steps on their knees.

Montenegro

After its split from Serbia, Montenegro is Europe’s latest holiday hot spot--and also the world’s newest independent nation. Along with three-course meals for $7 and rooms in private houses for $10, you’ll find a land of craggy mountains with a switch-backed Adriatic coastline of bays, beaches and villages of pale gray stone. The sea sparkles like blue topaz and medieval walled towns with crumbling fortresses and palaces are often emblazoned with the winged lion emblem of the Venetian Republic.

Now paint in monasteries slotted into mountain crevices and fishing villages of red-tiled roofs and deep-green shutters. Roman mosaics...olive groves...water-lilied lakes...deep canyons and the mighty Boka Kotorska, Europe’s southernmost fjord...the border town of Ulcinj with its minarets and tales of pirate slave-trading.

Austria

The Alps? There’s no denying that Switzerland is one of the most scenically gorgeous countries on earth. But unless you’re armed with an expense account, I can promise you that exploring its mountains, lakes and medieval towns will wreak havoc on your finances.

Winter or summer, neighboring Austria has just as much of the alpine wow factor...plus the city splendors of Vienna and Salzburg. And it’s a lot less expensive than you may think. For example, in the Tyrolean village of Fendels, you could rent a furnished apartment for two in a chalet next spring for as little as 175 euro ($230) per week. Surrounded by hiking trails, Fendels village makes an excellent base--the Tyrolean Oberland is close to the borders of Switzerland and Italy. (Go to the Austrian Tourist Board’s web site at http://www.tiscover.at and you’ll find plenty more self-catering accommodation at similar prices.)

Penang, Malaysia

A melting-pot of Malay, Chinese and Indian culture, Malaysia offers up powder white beaches and virgin rainforest teeming with wildlife; the bustling capital of Kuala Lumpur and the historic port city of Malacca; inexpensive seafood and inexpensive spa pampering; sailing, snorkeling, diving, fishing, golf and island-hopping.

With a distinct Chinese flavor, one of Malaysia’s star turns is Georgetown, capital of Penang island. You come across snake temples, arcaded shophouses and tiny workshops specializing in mahjong tiles and dice; kong-teik craftsmen who make funerary paper artifacts; fish getting dried like laundry in the open air. On the Weld Quay waterfront, around 2,000 fishing families live in rickety wooden dwellings on the Clan Quay jetties.

Chania, Crete

On the Greek island of Crete, Chania is one town that it would be criminal to miss. Crete’s former capital, its history goes back 5,000 years. In the Old Town’s skinny alleyways you’ll find icon workshops...lyres hanging in dusty musical instrument repair-shops...bursts of white jasmine cascading from archways...cats snoozing on balconies...the unlikely sights of a pencil-thin minaret above church towers and a mosque squatting on the waterfront.

Strung with garlands of colored light-bulbs, Chania’s old Venetian harbor at dusk truly is the stuff of romance. The water shimmers in waves of crimson, sapphire and emerald, the Venetian lighthouse sends out its beady wink, and stalls do a steady trade in pistachio nuts. Alleys that were afternoon-silent become thronged with locals taking the volta--the evening stroll. Even in July and August, you’ll find studio apartments here for under $40 a night...plus you can eat well for $10.

Bohemia, the Czech Republic

Prague teems with tourists but few people realize what the rest of the Czech Republic offers. One of its regions is Bohemia, blessed with a spellbinding mosaic of castles, frescoed houses and Rapunzel-style turrets straight from a sword-and-sorcery tale. At Cesky Krumlov you can peer into a medieval bear pit complete with bears. Sedlec, a suburb of Kutna Hora has a chapel entirely decorated with human bones, right down to its chandelier.

Many towns have stoupas...lofty "plague pillars" adorned with chained devils. They commemorate deliverance from the plagues, which swept Europe during the Middle Ages. Then there’s Karlovy Vary, the oldest of Bohemia’s grand spa towns. With spa water bubbling up all over town which visitors can collect for free, it’s a gorgeous place of baroque buildings in sugar-plum colors, flowery parks, and shops glittering with Bohemian crystal.

7 Tips For Successful Travel

We all travel a lot more now than our ancestors did. We travel all over the world and only think of the jet lag, and not the vast distances we cover. Our world has become smaller and more reachable. And this is a good thing. It helps us to understand different cultures, different people with different ways of living and working. But there are a few essentials you should always check before setting off.

1. It may seem obvious, but many people don’t bother to find out the most basic things about the country they will travel to. You should do this to avoid surprise or disappointment.

2. Check on the kind of weather you will find where you are going. If you live in Florida and travel to northern Greenland, you will be in for a shock unless you know that much colder weather is normal there.

3. Be sure that the medical and general insurance coverage you have (you do have, don’t you?) is adequate for your destination.

4. Do you have all the paperwork and documentation required for your trip? If not, get it!

5. Are there any diseases you will need immunization against where you are going? Check and find out before getting exposed.

6. If you plan on driving in the place you intend to travel to, check that you have an acceptable license. You may need an international driving license, for example. And are you familiar with the local driving laws where you are going? If not, become familiar, fast.

7. Finally, the most obvious one of all: is your passport up to date? And if not, do you have enough time to renew it before you set off? You’d be surprised, amazed even, at how many people get this one wrong.

A Gap Year Working And Traveling In Oz

Gap years are becoming ever more popular with students finishing their A-levels, wishing to mark their new found independence with a jaunt into the unknown, before committing to university life or employment. Who can blame them? There are hundreds of countries across the globe calling out for exploration. Perhaps none more so than Australia, complete with its limitless sun, sea and surf, outstanding architecture, unconquerable wilderness and sheer massiveness. However, it is the very scale of Australia that makes it somewhat daunting for many would-be travellers. Seeing it all, or even a decent portion of what Australia has to offer, is simply impossible in the 3 months offered by a standard travel visa. Sure, you can apply for an extended travel visa but these are hard to come by and few are lucky enough to have the savings to be able to support themselves over such a long period of time. Fortunately there is an alternative.

Many gap-year students are now taking advantage of the working holiday maker visa. The United Kingdom is one of 23 countries with which Australia has a reciprocal relationship whereby residents of one country can travel to the other for a period of 12 months and supplement their travel funds with wages earned from temporary employment. To qualify for this special visa applicants must be aged 18 to 30 and single or married without children, it is fair to say that most gap-year students would meet these requirements. However, there are a number of more subjective conditions that may exclude some candidates, for example, you must show that you have a good chance of finding temporary work (experience working in a bar or as an outdoor-activity instructor may be helpful) and must also have a return ticket or prove that you have sufficient funds to purchase one. To check if you are likely to qualify for such a visa http://www.visas4australia.com may be worth a visit.

Even if you do qualify for the visa there are restrictions - you are only allowed to work for a single employer for a period of 3 months, this is to encourage travel and to ensure that you do not become too settled in a single place. Of course you could get around this restriction by accepting employment in the same area but with a different company, however, surely the whole reason for a gap year is to seek out new experiences, new people and new places.

So, let's assume that you qualify for a visa, what is there to do once you have reached Australia? Must see cities include; Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane, Cairns and, of course, the capital itself (in fact entirely built for this single purpose) - Canberra. Famous tourist attractions such as; Ayers Rock (or Uluru to give it its Aboriginal name), the Sydney Opera House and the Great Barrier Reef are also more than worth a visit. There is undoubtedly enough here to fill 12 months with unmitigated adventure and the experiences of several lifetimes.

Australia is amazing and the working holiday maker visa means gap year students can experience more of it for longer but, as always, it is important to be safe and plan your journeys carefully. Now that you know all you need to for an enjoyable gap year tip down-under, all that remains for me to say is: good luck, have fun and always remember to wear sun screen!

Become a Hotels Etc. Influencer today!

Are you a travel influencer? 😇 Hotels Etc. are looking for people like you to join their new influencer membership club. Keep reading to learn more about how you can promote their products in exchange for free stays at fabulous hotels. We’re Hotels Etc. and we’re looking for location-independent influencers / travelers between the ages of 18-35 to build relationships with and promote all of our travel products on their platforms in exchange for a membership. Hotels Etc. offers members up to 75% off hotel bookings and exclusive member savings on flights, vacation packages, car rentals & more! We’re looking for social media influencers who are active in the travel industry and have a wide following (50k+) on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and more! Interested? To apply, please fill out the form at https://forms.gle/QA5mmjx6R1bYUM1D7